An index to quantify an individual's scientific research output

I would like to propose a single number, the ‘‘h index,’’ as a simple and useful way to characterize the scientific output of a researcher

J. E. Hirsch

2005

Scholarcy highlights

  • For the few scientists who earn a Nobel prize, the impact and relevance of their research is unquestionable
  • I would like to propose a single number, the ‘‘h index,’’ as a simple and useful way to characterize the scientific output of a researcher
  • The research reported here concentrated on physicists; I suggest that the h index should be useful for other scientific disciplines as well. The highest h among physicists appears to be E
  • That gives a lower bound on the total number of citations to Witten’s papers at h2 ϭ 12,100
  • The total number of citations will usually be much larger than h2, because h2 both underestimates the total number of citations of the h most-cited papers and ignores the papers with Ͻh citations
  • I argue that two individuals with similar hs are comparable in terms of their overall scientific impact, even if their total number of papers or their total number of citations is very different

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.