Deconstructing the collaborative impact: Article and author characteristics that influence citation count

As suggested by previous research, adding an author to an article positively impacts the number of citations the article receives; the influence of this attribute is greatly lessened after accounting for the other author and article attributes

Lori A. Hurley; Andrea L. Ogier; Vetle I. Torvik

2014

Scholarcy highlights

  • As suggested by previous research, adding an author to an article positively impacts the number of citations the article receives; the influence of this attribute is greatly lessened after accounting for the other author and article attributes
  • When combined with the finding that a smaller standard of deviation in h-index correlates with citations in the 3-7 group, we conclude that smaller superstar groups may be likely to achieve comparable citations levels with large, highly networked collaborations
  • Negative correlations emerged between citation and both professional age and total number of collaborators, while collaboration rate, associated with a shorter career, predicted citation
  • The gender diversity outcomes suggest that mixed groups may be ideal, and further research in this area is indicated
  • Attribute reduction To achieve higher variability in the dataset, binary attributes below or above certain thresholds were removed. These included the following: publication types and Medical Subject Headings terms with frequency totaling either less than 5% of the total number of instances or greater than 95% of the total instances, and geographical affiliations with frequency totaling either less than 1% of the total number of instances or greater than 99% of the total instances
  • Limitations and Value The purpose of this study is to serve as a starting point for exploring the effect of group author characteristics on citation counts within PubMed Central; while PubMed and PubMed Central represent a valuable disciplinary and scholarly ecosystem for citation-based bibliometric study, further research is required to test whether our results hold across a global scale

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