Workplace Wellness Programs Study: Final Report

We found statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements among program participants in exercise frequency, smoking behavior, and weight control, but not cholesterol control

Soeren Mattke; Harry Liu; John Caloyeras; Christina Huang; Kristin Van Busum; Dmitry Khodyakov; Victoria Shier

2020

Scholarcy highlights

  • The Pardee RAND Graduate School is the largest public policy Ph.D. program in the nation and the only program based at an independent public policy research organization—the RAND Corporation
  • The report investigates the characteristics of workplace wellness programs, their prevalence and impact on employee health and medical cost, facilitators of their success, and the role of incentives in such programs
  • The report investigates the characteristics of workplace wellness programs, their prevalence, their impact on employee health and medical cost, facilitators of their success, and the role of incentives in such programs
  • The authors employ four data collection and analysis streams: a review of the scientific and trade literature, a national survey of employers, a longitudinal analysis of medical claims and wellness program data from a sample of employers, and five case studies of existing wellness programs in a diverse set of employers to gauge the effectiveness of wellness programs and employees' and employers' experiences
  • Participation in a wellness program over five years is associated with lower health care costs and decreasing health care use
  • The RAND Corporation is a research organization that develops solutions to public policy challenges to help make communities throughout the world safer and more secure, healthier and more prosperous

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