Spontaneous Unexplained Preterm Labor with Intact Membrane: Finding Protein Biomarkers through Placenta Proteome

We have identified 12 potentially important protein differences in the placenta of Spontaneous unexplained preterm labor with intact membrane

Niu J. Tan; Leona D.J. Daim; Amilia A.M. Jamil; Norhafizah Mohtarrudin; Karuppiah Thilakavathy

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • Spontaneous preterm labor is one of the major causes of preterm birth, which accounts for 56% of the total PTB and it possesses deteriorating effects, both long and short term, on the health of the mother and the offspring
  • Pregnant women resulted in a PTB due to Spontaneous unexplained preterm labor with intact membrane have significantly lighter babies and placentas than their control
  • Placenta was an excellent biological tissue that might facilitate the discovery of potential biomarkers as well as to assess dysfunction in the framework of sPTL-IM
  • Proteomic approaches have enabled the discovery of potential biomarkers in the placenta and unveiled the pathophysiological pathways associated to sPTL-IM
  • The identified proteins involved in four distinct functional classes include inflammation, oxidative stress, anticoagulation, and extracellular matrix remodeling leading to preterm parturition. These results can help in the future selection of more meaningful potential biomarkers for the early detection of sPTL-IM that might appear in accessible body fluid
  • It is postulated that signals for the initiation of sPTL-IM are more likely to arise from the fetus and to a lesser extent from the mother due to more proteins differentially expressed in the fetal side of the placenta of sPTL-IM
  • It is postulated that signals for the initiation of Spontaneous unexplained preterm labor with intact membrane are more likely to arise from the fetus and to a lesser extent from the mother due to more proteins differentially expressed in the fetal side of the placenta of sPTL-IM

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