Depression prevention program for workers of private companies: A randomized controlled trial

This study was based on stress inoculation training, one of the methods of cognitive behavioral approach, so we considered it appropriate to use CES-D for our stress-management program assessment

Mariko Kawaharada

2013

Scholarcy highlights

  • Depressive illness is projected to be the second leading cause of disability worldwide in 2020
  • Concerning the depression score changes, the “Improvement” group of the intervention subjects showed an adjusted odds ratios of 6.83 that was higher compared to the control group, indicating a marginally significant difference
  • The results suggest the possibility that the stress inoculation training-based program of this study was effective for improving coping and preventing depression
  • The adjusted OR of the “Improvement” group of the intervention subjects was higher compared to the control group, indicating a marginally significant difference
  • There was no significant difference between the depression scores before and after the intervention, indicating no intervention effect on depression
  • When the depression score changes were sorted into “Improvement” and “No improvement” groups, the “Improvement” group showed an adjusted OR of 6.83 that was higher compared to the control group, indicating a marginally significant difference
  • Further research in this field is necessary for developing a simple and effective educational program adjusted to individual, occupational and other differences to prevent depression and other mental health problems among Japanese workers

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