Cysteine in Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease is characterized by selective loss of neurons in the hippocampus and neocortex due to abnormalities in proteins, mainly Aβ peptide and tau protein, in the form of abnormal protein aggregations or depositions in neurons

Suvarna P. Ingale; Rupali Patil; Aman B. Upaganlawar

2020

Scholarcy highlights

  • Alzheimer's disease is characterized by selective loss of neurons in the hippocampus and neocortex due to abnormalities in proteins, mainly Aβ peptide and tau protein, in the form of abnormal protein aggregations or depositions in neurons
  • Oxidative/nitrosative stress has been identified as an important facilitator of neurodegeneration in AD
  • Cysteine-dependent proteins are known to be associated with the neurodegenerative process
  • This chapter deals with the role of cysteine in handling reactive oxygen/nitrogen species during oxidative/nitrosative stress and posttranslational modification of proteins causing protein misfolding or protein aggregation during neurodegeneration associated with AD
  • If any questions arise related to the accuracy of the information contained in the translated website, please refer to the English version of the website which is the official version

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