Gels Obtained by Colloidal Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic Molecules

Self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in solution can lead to a large variety of different colloidal structures, where these structures can have a profound effect on the macroscopic properties of these solutions

Paula Malo de Molina

2017

Scholarcy highlights

  • Self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in solution can lead to a large variety of different colloidal structures, where these structures can have a profound effect on the macroscopic properties of these solutions
  • Self-assembly naturally requires amphiphilic molecules and the systems described here are based on surfactants and to some extent on amphiphilic copolymers
  • The formation of very elongated worm-like micelles can lead to gelation, provided the structural relaxation times of these systems is long enough
  • One may employ amphiphilic copolymers of hydrophobically modified water soluble polymers that allow for network formation in solution by self-assembly due to having several hydrophobic modifications per polymer
  • We will discuss in the various chapters different typical approaches to achieve colloidal gels by self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules, which are based on wormlike micelles, densely packed vesicles, self-assembling polymers, or bridging of surfactant structures by amphiphilic copolymers
  • As the field of stimuli responsive polymers and their effect on macroscopic properties is a very wide one we want in the following only discuss some exemplary cases relevant for gelation, for instance arising from interconnection of self-assembled entities

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