Factors Related to Physician Burnout and Its Consequences: A Review

We provide a detailed discussion of the contributors and consequences of physician burnout and its impact on patient care, physician health, and the health care system after reviewing the studies published in peer-reviewed scientific journals

Rikinkumar Patel; Ramya Bachu; Archana Adikey; Meryem Malik; Mansi Shah

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • Burnout is a psychological syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of reduced accomplishment in day-to-day work
  • We provide a detailed discussion of the contributors and consequences of physician burnout and its impact on patient care, physician health, and the health care system after reviewing the studies published in peer-reviewed scientific journals
  • A national survey conducted among physicians across all specialties in 2014 found that physicians who used electronic health records and computerized physician order entry were less satisfied with the time spent on clerical work and were at increased risk of professional exhaustion
  • Females are more likely to experience burnout because of the strong influence of emotional exhaustion on depersonalization, which can further lead to reduced personal accomplishment
  • It is conceivable that the clerical work intrudes on the physician’s time, resulting in emotional exhaustion, depersonalization or a diminished sense of personal success, substance abuse, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and suicidality
  • Physicians should be encouraged to engage in relaxation techniques like yoga, meditation, and other relaxation techniques, and to approach therapists to vent their frustrations
  • Doctors who keep working despite experiencing signs of burnout are more likely to have decreased work productivity, exhaustion, and poor quality of care when compared to their earlier careers

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