Modified Black Soldier Fly Larva Fat in Broiler Diet: Effects on Performance, Carcass Traits, Blood Parameters, Histomorphological Features and Gut Microbiota

The results of this study suggested that the broiler chickens were within the physiological conditions and confirmed that BSF and MBSF larva fats did not affect the health status of the animals

Sihem Dabbou; Angelo Lauwaerts; Ilario Ferrocino; Ilaria Biasato; Federico Sirri; Marco Zampiga; Stefania Bergagna; Giulia Pagliasso; Marta Gariglio; Elena Colombino; Carlos Garc├ęs Narro; Francesco Gai; Maria Teresa Capucchio; Laura Gasco; Luca Cocolin; Achille Schiavone

2021

Scholarcy highlights

  • Nowadays, the poultry industry is one the most important and fast-growing among livestock sectors
  • Dietary BSF larvae fat and modified BSF fat inclusion did not affect the growth performance of the broiler chickens, even if a statistical trend was observed for LW at day 33, Average daily feed intake, and average daily weight gain
  • The results of this study suggested that the broiler chickens were within the physiological conditions and confirmed that BSF and MBSF larva fats did not affect the health status of the animals
  • The current study provides novel useful information on the use of BSF larvae fat and modified BSF larvae fat in broiler chicken diets
  • A shift in the microbiota composition was observed as a function of the diets
  • The positive modulation of microbiota observed in BSF larvae fat-fed broilers is relevant, because the inclusion of these novel ingredients could allow the reduction of antimicrobial use along with the associated phenomena of microbial resistance in poultry

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