Effects of Levels of Self-Regulation and Regulatory Teaching on Strategies for Coping With Academic Stress in Undergraduate Students

For hypotheses 1 and 2, the results offer evidence that a graded increase in level of regulation gives rise to a proportionate decrease in emotion-focused strategies, and a proportionate increase in problem-focused coping strategies

Jesús de la Fuente; Jorge Amate; María Carmen González-Torres; Raquel Artuch; Juan Manuel García-Torrecillas; Salvatore Fadda

2020

Scholarcy highlights

  • The study of students’ emotional experiences in the teaching and learning context has yielded much research on aspects previously unconsidered by the cognitivist paradigm
  • The present research report adopts an interactive student-teacher approach to academic stress, analyzing stress that arises from the interaction of the student’s learning process with characteristics of the teaching process
  • The sample was composed of students enrolled in Psychology, Primary Education, and Early Childhood Education degrees; 82.7% were women and 17.3% were men
  • 28.3% were first-year students, 40.3% were in second year, 14.5% in third year, and 16.5% were in the fourth year of the degree program
  • SRL vs. ERL Theory predicted that university studentscoping strategies could be determined, jointly, by the students’ degree of self-regulation and by the level of contextual, external regulation from the teaching process. This type of interaction could be understood as the combination of low-medium-high levels of the two factors, as supported by prior evidence in this direction
  • For hypotheses 1 and 2, the results offer evidence that a graded increase in level of regulation gives rise to a proportionate decrease in emotion-focused strategies, and a proportionate increase in problem-focused coping strategies
  • The causes of learning and achievement problems can be both internal to the student and external, in the teaching process, what is certain is that the meta-emotional factors addressed here are significant in health predictions

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