Severe Dementia Predicts Weight Loss by the Time of Death

We aimed to investigate the association between Body mass index and dementia in deceased individuals who underwent a full-body autopsy examination.Methods: Weight and height were measured before the autopsy exam

Aline Maria M. Ciciliati; Izabela Ono Adriazola; Daniela Souza Farias-Itao; Carlos Augusto Pasqualucci; Renata Elaine Paraizo Leite; Ricardo Nitrini; Lea T. Grinberg; Wilson Jacob-Filho; Claudia Kimie Suemoto

2021

Scholarcy highlights

  • Dementia affects 46 million people worldwide, and 58% of these people live in low-/middle-income countries
  • We aimed to investigate the association between Body mass index and dementia in deceased individuals who underwent a full-body autopsy examination
  • Moderate and severe dementia were associated with lower BMI compared with participants with normal cognition in fully adjusted models
  • In older individuals, BMI was not associated with higher dementia risk in some studies, and even higher BMI values were related to lower dementia risk
  • Another reason for BMI to be found to be protective against dementia could be the presence of consumptive conditions, which lead to weight loss, but were not fully adjusted in previous studies
  • We found an association of BMI with moderate and severe dementia, suggesting that individuals with more advanced dementia are more likely to have lower body weight by the time of death
  • Body mass index was associated with moderate and severe dementia in late life, but we did not find associations of BMI with less advanced dementia stages

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