Editorial: Mycorrhizosphere Communication: Mycorrhizal Fungi and Endophytic Fungus-Plant Interactions

Specialty section: This article was submitted to Fungi and Their Interactions, a section of the journal Frontiers in Microbiology

Erika Kothe; Katarzyna Turnau

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • Specialty section: This article was submitted to Fungi and Their Interactions, a section of the journal Frontiers in Microbiology
  • As well as above-ground plant tissues, endophytic fungi can be considered as examples of specific co-evolution, provided the term “endophytic” is used in its sensu strictu
  • The traits of endophytes that do not lead to symptoms in a healthy plant clearly delineate them from phytopathogenic fungi, caution is necessary because their effect on the symbiosis can vary with the species/variety of the partner and environmental conditions
  • Knowledge is much more limited as compared to mycorrhiza, a role for strigolactone signaling is presented by Rozpadek et al Temporal shifts in plant-associated fungal populations are known to occur
  • An example from mycorrhizal symbiosis is for young trees with endomycorrhizal symbionts that are later replaced by specific ectomycorrhizal associations
  • A tripartite interaction occurs in which the zygomycete-derived metabolite, D-orenone, induces a transporter that allows for increased excretion of indole-3-acetic acid by the mycorrhizal fungus, T. vaccinum
  • To be successful, we need an increased understanding by both food and wood producers on the molecular communication between fungi and the host plant, resulting in competitive advantages under abiotic stress

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