Macrophages in Synovial Inflammation

This study found that knockout of the NFκB p50 subunit prevented the development of tolerance in LPS challenged Mφ by restoring M1 mediators and inhibiting M2 cytokines

Aisling Kennedy; Ursula Fearon; Douglas J. Veale; Catherine Godson

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • Macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue, along with fibroblasts
  • It is estimated that rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis each affects approximately 1% of the population, leading to patient pain and disability as well as contributing to a great economic burden in terms of lost working days and patient health services and is an area of intense investigation
  • TNFα is a master cytokine in inflammation and as such is a potent inducer of other pro-inflammatory cytokines, is chemotactic for leukocytes, is a potent inducer of angiogenesis, stimulates adhesion molecule expression in SFC in vitro, and lymphoid migration into inflamed synovial tissue in vivo
  • This study found that knockout of the NFκB p50 subunit prevented the development of tolerance in LPS challenged Mφ by restoring M1 mediators and inhibiting M2 cytokines
  • In the study of inflammation and our efforts to promote its normal resolution, Mφ remain to the fore of our interest
  • Mφ will continue to be a focal point for therapeutic intervention which, currently, centers around cytokine blockade but has the possibility of extending into Mφ re-programming
  • This remains an interesting and a yet to be fully explored option in terms of treatment for synovial inflammation

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.