Temporal distribution of encapsulated bacteriophages during passage through the chick gastrointestinal tract

We developed an encapsulated phage product made of Ca2+-alginatewhey protein gel beads that insufficiently released the phage within the body of young chicks after oral administration

Yin-Hing Ma; Golam S. Islam; Ying Wu; Parviz M. Sabour; James R. Chambers; Qi Wang; Shirley X.Y. Wu; Mansel W. Griffiths

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • We aimed to identify any potential exposure conditions during oral delivery that may have a detrimental effect on phage survival or during sample recovery for enumeration by plaque assay, e.g., to feed and simulated digestive conditions, as phages are known to be sensitive to many conditions
  • The main objectives of the present research were: 1) to modify the calcium alginate-whey protein formulation to produce a faster release rate, 2) to identify any potential exposure conditions during oral delivery that may have a detrimental effect on phage survival during sample recovery from the gastrointestinal tract to determine the passage and excretion times and in vivo distribution of orally administered phage
  • Formulation F5 was chosen for further study because the beads from this formulation were more uniform in size distribution and contained more high-molecular weight alginate for better mechanical strength
  • The main objectives of the current work were to assess specific concerns surrounding the oral delivery of encapsulated phage and free phage to young chicks for eventual bio-control of pathogenic Salmonella
  • There were no significant differences between the formulations within each time point
  • We aim to achieve more rapid phage release under intestinal pH conditions considering the specific characteristics of the GI of young chicks
  • The high initial phage dose experienced segmented movement along the gastrointestinal tract from peristalsis in addition to dilution by continued feeding/drinking, and one cannot rule out absorption of phage into the chick’s organs or other compartments, since phage have been observed to pass into the blood stream following oral administration in chicks, mice and humans, with the spleen and liver being the primary organs responsible for removing phage from the circulation

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