Lymphocytic Mitochondrial Aconitase Activity is Reduced in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Conclusion:Our results suggest that ACO2 activity is reduced in peripheral lymphocytes of subjects with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment and correlates with antioxidant protection

Francesca Mangialasche; Mauro Baglioni; Roberta Cecchetti; Miia Kivipelto; Carmelinda Ruggiero; Danilo Piobbico; Lothar Kussmaul; Roberto Monastero; Stefano Brancorsini; Patrizia Mecocci

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • Specific mechanisms behind the role of oxidative/nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis remain elusive
  • Objective:We assessed activity and expression of ACO2 extracted from blood lymphocytes of subjects with AD, mild cognitive impairment, older adults with normal cognition, and younger adults with normal cognition
  • Results:ACO2 activity was significantly lower in AD and MCI cases than controls: ACO2 median activity was 0.64 ± 0.21 U/mg protein for AD, 0.93 ± 0.28 U/mg protein for MCI, 1.17 ± 0.78 U/mg protein for OCN subjects, and 1.23 ± 0.43 U/mg protein for YCN individuals
  • In subjects with AD and MCI, ACO2 expression was lower than OCN subjects, and ACO2 activity correlated with vitamin E plasma levels and Mini-Mental State Examination total score
  • Conclusion:Our results suggest that ACO2 activity is reduced in peripheral lymphocytes of subjects with AD and MCI and correlates with antioxidant protection
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