Treatment of chlamydial infections: 2014 update

Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens whose entry into mucosal epithelial cells is required for intracellular survival and subsequent growth

Stephan A Kohlhoff; Margaret R Hammerschlag

2015

Scholarcy highlights

  • Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens whose entry into mucosal epithelial cells is required for intracellular survival and subsequent growth
  • Areas covered: This paper reviews the current literature on the antimicrobial susceptibilities and treatment of genital infections due to C. trachomatis and respiratory infections due to C. pneumoniae published since 2011
  • Expert opinion: Chlamydiae are susceptible to antibiotics that interfere with DNA and protein synthesis, including tetracyclines, macrolides and quinolones, which are the compounds that have been most extensively studied and used for treatment of human infection
  • Since our original review was published in 2011, there have been some major advances in diagnostic tests for C. trachomatis and the introduction of the first FDA-approved test for the detection of C. pneumoniae in respiratory samples
  • There are a small number of new drugs currently in preclinical development and early clinical trials that may have a role in the treatment of chlamydial infections
  • The authors have no relevant affiliations or financial involvement with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or financial conflict with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript
  • This includes employment, consultancies, honoraria, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, grants or patents received or pending, or royalties

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