The effect of peer collaboration on children's problem-solving ability

The current study aimed to investigate the effect of collaborative learning on children's problem solving ability and whether differences in knowledge status or the use of explanatocy language were contributing factors

Lillian M. Fawcett; Alison F. Garton

2005

Key concepts

Scholarcy highlights

  • Researchers in the Vygotsk:ian tradition argue that cognitive development is most likely to occur when two participants, who differ in tenns oftheir initial level of competence, work collaboratively on a task to arrive at a shared understanding
  • This paper considers elements ofPiaget's and Vygotsky's cognitive development theories in an attempt to explain some of the processes underlying peer collaboration, that may lead to cognitive change
  • It is contended that the two theories are not as mutually exclusive as they are often portrayed. It appears that an important component in both theories is that cognitive change results when the interaction exposes a participant to a different knowledge source, whether it be due to a conflicting perspective, or a higher level of expertise
  • This paper considers elements ofPiaget's and Vygotsky's cognitive development theories that may help explain some ofthe processes underlying peer collaboration, which lead to cognitive change
  • Researchers in the Vygotskian tradition argue that cognitive development is most likely to occur when two participants, who differ in terms oftheir initial level of competence, work collaboratively on a task to arrive at a joint understanding
  • The interaction needs to be with a more competent partner, or one with a different knowledge base, to ensure there is the necessary mismatch required to promote the re-examination of the child's own understanding which leads to internal reorganisation anri cognitive change

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