Palliative Oncologists: Specialists in the Science and Art of Patient Care

Corresponding author: David Hui, MD, MSc, Department of Palliative Care and Rehabilitation Medicine, Unit 1414, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030; e-mail: dhui@ mdanderson.org

David Hui

2015

Scholarcy highlights

  • Among type I oncologists, those who are palliphilic, as one might say, may choose to dedicate their careers to improving the quality of life of patients and their families through excellence in patient care, education, and research in palliative oncology
  • Corresponding author: David Hui, MD, MSc, Department of Palliative Care and Rehabilitation Medicine, Unit 1414, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030; e-mail: dhui@ mdanderson.org
  • But had been told she was too weak. She told me that her goal was “to get strong enough for more chemotherapy.” She had interpreted the previous oncology attending’s statement about her fitness for chemotherapy as a challenge, and thought, “If I can get stronger, I can get more.” Knowing and trusting my colleague, I imagine his statement was meant as a stepping stone toward a transition to hospice
  • A palliative oncologist may not refer as many patients to specialist palliative care because he or she may be able to address the patient’s needs during routine clinical visits
  • Palliative oncologists can help their nononcology-trained colleagues and palliative care fellows appreciate the wide variation in prognosis, expected response to treatment among different types of cancer, treatment adverse effects, and the general principles of treatment decision making
  • Cancer center leadership can support this new subspecialty by hiring palliative oncologists, endorsing initiatives that are aimed at integrating oncology and palliative care, and providing appropriate reimbursement
  • For individuals who envision closer collaborations between oncology and palliative care for the purposes of enhancing the quality of care and making exciting discoveries that might help to improve patients’ quality of life, palliative oncology is a rewarding subspecialty with boundless opportunities for patient care, education, and research

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.