Implementation of diverse non-centrosymmetric layer concepts for tuning the interface activity of a magnesium alloy

As revealed by the results presented in Fig. 6, this effect resulted from the polymer additive G50

Stephani Stamboroski

2016

Scholarcy highlights

  • Due to their low density and adequate mechanical properties, magnesium and its alloys are promising materials for structural applications
  • The effects of barrier layers that have been applied by the deposition of siliceous polymer coatings in low pressure plasma processes, by laser surface treatments in controlled gas atmospheres or by dipping in liquid formulations containing a recently developed polymeric inhibitor or a mixture of the enzyme laccase and the polysaccharide maltodextrin are monitored
  • Characterization of polished AM50 substrates According to the Energy dispersive X-ray analysis characterization performed with a primary electron energy of 30 keV, the AM50 substrates under investigation were composed of 86 wt% magnesium, 5.5 wt% aluminum, 0.5 wt% zinc, 0.3 wt% manganese, and 0.1 wt% silicon, with the balance comprising carbon and oxygen containing species attributed to the sample surfaces
  • That is a time-scale comparable to that required for the drying and hardening of water-based primer, coating or adhesive systems. Combining such approaches with the application of a preceding dry process, as shown for cases a and b, may further enhance the performance of the functional layer system. In this contribution, the effects of barrier layers, which had been applied to polished magnesium alloy AM50 surfaces either by the deposition of siliceous polymer coatings in low pressure plasma processes, by laser surface treatments in controlled gas atmospheres, or by dipping in liquid formulations containing a recently developed polymeric inhibitor or a mixture of the enzyme laccase and the polysaccharide maltodextrin, were monitored with regards to their interactions with molecular water films
  • These films may be comprehended as a simplified implementation of mixed molecular films that are essential during the build-up of adhesion in painting or adhesive systems
  • Authors’ contributions StSt and PSt laid out and performed the Hydrogen Bubble Formation Test, contributed to the discussion of microscopic and spectroscopic data; PSt and WN contributed with the AM50 laser surface treatment; YC performed Scanning Probe Microscopy investigations and developed and set up the biofunctionalization experiments of magnesium surfaces with laccase supported by StSt and contributed to the lay-out and formatting of the article; DS trained and advised the low pressure plasma team comprising GH and WK who performed the plasma polymer coatings and characterized their structural and surface properties; JI trained and advised the laser surface treatment team comprising PSt and WN who contributed to the laser treatment and the microscopic and spectroscopic characterization of the surfaces; MN trained and advised the surface characterization team, comprising StSt, PSt and WN, and took part in defining and setting up the experiments, performing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations, and analyzing data; and WLC contributed in planning the conceptual approach for joint research in several teams, discussing and merging the obtained data, and in drafting the manuscript
  • Acknowledgements The authors are grateful to Science without Borders, to Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico and to Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior, to CONICIT Costa Rica, to Leandro Gonçalves de Andrade Rosato for support when applying the Aerosol Wetting Test, Dr Marko Soltau for providing material and taking part in fruitful discussions, to Dr Karsten Thiel for performing electron microscopy inves‐ tigations, to Dr Uwe Specht for facilitating laser surface treatments, and to Prof

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