1,25-(OH)2D3/Vitamin D receptor alleviates systemic lupus erythematosus by downregulating Skp2 and upregulating p27

This study indicated that 1,25-(OH)2D3/vitamin D receptor facilitated the recovery of systemic lupus erythematosus by downregulating Skp2 and upregulating p27 expression, suggesting the potential of 1,25-(OH)2D3/VDR as a promising target for SLE treatment

Dan Liu

2019

Scholarcy highlights

  • Recent evidence has suggested that the 1,25(OH)2D3/Vitamin D receptor acts to suppress the immune response associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, a serious multisystem autoimmune disease
  • SLE vitamin D receptor-insert mice were selected for the purposes of the study to investigate the role of the overexpression of VDR in the alleviation of SLE in mice
  • Peripheral blood of SLE patients exhibits reduced hemoglobin and platelets SLE is predominately associated with immunopathogenesis
  • The results suggested there to be a lower level of hemoglobin and fewer platelets among SLE patients
  • SLE + VD3 and SLE + VD3 + VDRinsert groups were significantly reduced at week 24 with the contents in the mice in the SLE + VD3 + VDRinsert group even decreased to the normal level. These results indicated that 1,25(OH)2D3/VDR reduced the elevations of blood urea nitrogen and Cr and urinary protein levels otherwise seen in SLE mice
  • There were no significant differences in gender and age between the incipient SLE patients and healthy controls
  • Taken together, the key evidence obtained during the current study suggests that 1,25(OH)2D3/VDR acts to stimulate the recovery from SLE symptoms by downregulating Skp2 and upregulating the p27, highlighting a promising novel therapeutic target for future SLE treatment
  • The key evidence obtained during the current study suggests that 1,25(OH)2D3/vitamin D receptor acts to stimulate the recovery from systemic lupus erythematosus symptoms by downregulating Skp2 and upregulating the p27, highlighting a promising novel therapeutic target for future SLE treatment

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