Elevated plasma succinate levels are linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk factors in young adults

We examined whether succinate levels correlate with traditional and novel cardiovascular disease risk factors in a well-phenotyped cohort of young adults

Francisco J. Osuna-Prieto; Borja Martinez-Tellez; Lourdes Ortiz-Alvarez; Xinyu Di; Lucas Jurado-Fasoli; Huiwen Xu; Victoria Ceperuelo-Mallafré; Catalina Núñez-Roa; Isabelle Kohler; Antonio Segura-Carretero; José V. García-Lario; Angel Gil; Concepción M. Aguilera; Jose M. Llamas-Elvira; Patrick C. N. Rensen; Joan Vendrell; Jonatan R. Ruiz; Sonia Fernández-Veledo

2021

Scholarcy highlights

  • Succinate is produced by both host and microbiota, with a key role in the interplay of immunity and metabolism and an emerging role as a biomarker for inflammatory and metabolic disorders in middle-aged adults
  • We examined whether succinate levels correlate with traditional and novel cardiovascular disease risk factors in a well-phenotyped cohort of young adults
  • Participants The present study was conducted within the framework of the ACTIvating Brown Adipose Tissue through Exercise study, a randomized controlled trial designed to determine the effect of exercise on brown adipose tissue activity
  • We found a great variability in plasma succinate levels in the cohort
  • Here, we demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge that plasma succinate is associated with visceral adipose tissue mass, serum triglycerides and C-reactive protein levels, and diastolic blood pressure in young adults
  • Our study reveals that plasma succinate levels are linked to a specific pro-inflammatory omega-6 signature pattern and higher VAT levels, and might be useful as a novel clinical tool to identify young individuals at higher CVD risk, allowing the implementation of effective preventive treatment
  • Author details 1 PROFITH Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain

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