The cytotoxicity of polycationic iron oxide nanoparticles: Common endpoint assays and alternative approaches for improved understanding of cellular response mechanism

Our findings indicate that common in vitro cell endpoint assays do not give detailed and complete information on cellular state and it is essential to explore novel approaches and carry out more in-depth studies to elucidate cellular response mechanism to magnetic nanoparticles

Clare Hoskins

2012

Scholarcy highlights

  • Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have an increasing number of biomedical applications
  • The broad peak observed at 3100 cm-1 was due to free water which was still present in this hygroscopic significantly reducing to 237 nm and 262 nm respectively
  • The surface charge of the MNPs was determined by zeta potential measurement
  • The ‘naked’ MNP’s possessed a negative surface charge due to sulphate associations previously reported to result from the synthetic route
  • The decrease observed is attributed to the presence of -OH groups on the poly(ethylene glycol) coating as previously reported
  • After 72 h incubation a significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase leakage was observed across the whole concentration range
  • Polymer coating was achieved with both PEI and PEG which was confirmed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and zeta potential measurement
  • Our findings indicate that common in vitro cell endpoint assays do not give detailed and complete information on cellular state and it is essential to explore novel approaches and carry out more in-depth studies to elucidate cellular response mechanism to magnetic nanoparticles

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