Finding Our Way: An Introduction to Path Analysis

Life insists on being more complicated, and there are situations in which, if we are asked whether a certain variable is a DV or an independent variables, we would have to say, “Yes.” Let’s assume, for example, that we found that women with young children at home suffer more from depression than women matched for age and marital status who do not have kids at home

David L Streiner

2017

Scholarcy highlights

  • · Path analysis can be used to analyze models that are more complex than multiple regression
  • It goes beyond regression in that it allows for the analysis of more complicated models
  • Life insists on being more complicated, and there are situations in which, if we are asked whether a certain variable is a dependent variables or an independent variables, we would have to say, “Yes.” Let’s assume, for example, that we found that women with young children at home suffer more from depression than women matched for age and marital status who do not have kids at home
  • Path analysis is an extension of multiple regression that allows us to examine more complicated relations among the variables than having several IVs predict one DV and to compare different models against one another to see which one best fits the data
  • Mastering a new computer program and new terminology is perhaps the easiest part; the more demanding requirement is that far greater attention must be paid to the underlying model, in terms of including as many relevant variables as possible, weeding out irrelevant ones, and specifying relations among the variables
  • Path analysis provides a stepping stone to an even more sophisticated and useful technique—structural equation modelling—which will be discussed in a subsequent article

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