Message Framing and Persuasion: A Message Processing Analysis

Previous research has indicated that the way in which a message is framed affects the amount of persuasion it elicits

Stephen M. Smith; Richard E. Petty

2007

Key concepts

Scholarcy highlights

  • Previous research has indicated that the way in which a message is framed affects the amount of persuasion it elicits
  • The authors hypothesized that differential processing of negatively and positively framed messages is a factor that contributes to the differential persuasiveness that has been observed
  • By manipulating the expected framing and the actual framing of messages, the authors found that either negatively or positively framed messages could lead to more extensive processing, depending on which was less expected

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