What Teachers Retain From Historic Site-Based Professional Development

Influenced by the Interconnected Model of Teacher Growth and Complexity theory, this study considers the complex outcomes of teachers as individuals, professionals, and learners in communities of practice

Christine Baron; Sherri Sklarwitz; Hyeyoung Bang; Hanadi Shatara

2019

Scholarcy highlights

  • Historic sites1 are complex semiotic and curricular spaces designed to teach visitors about the people and/or events on which the site’s import rests
  • There is a growing body of research centered at historic sites, but it has largely focused on student and/or augmented learning with emerging technologies
  • The present study focused on how the participants perceived their historic site-based professional development experience from pre-sort at the start of the institute, to the post-sort at institute’s end, to the post-post sort administered 6 months later, when teachers were back in their classrooms
  • While many distinguishing statements from rank as +6 or −6, many statements rank between +3 and −3, offering a more sober view of what teachers retained from HSBPD, rather than what is exciting about being at the historic site
  • HSBPD offer teachers opportunities to engage as individuals, professionals, and in communities of learners with complex historical and professional resources
  • This study offers an entry point for further examinations of what aspects of HSBPDs remain once teachers return to their classrooms and begin to change their classroom practice
  • This study offers an entry point for further examinations of what aspects of historic site-based professional development remain once teachers return to their classrooms and begin to change their classroom practice

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