Heart rate variability during the acute phase of myocardial infarction.

We studied 54 consecutive patients with evidence of acute myocardial infarction by collecting the 24-hour Heart rate SD from Holter tapes recorded on day 2 or 3

G C Casolo; P Stroder; C Signorini; F Calzolari; M Zucchini; E Balli; A Sulla; S Lazzerini

2012

Scholarcy highlights

  • After acute myocardial infarction, several abnormalities of the autonomic control to the heart have been described
  • We studied 54 consecutive patients with evidence of AMI by collecting the 24-hour Heart rate SD from Holter tapes recorded on day 2 or 3
  • HR variability during the early phase of AMI is decreased and is significantly related to clinical and hemodynamic indexes of severity
  • It is suggested that early measurements of HR variability during AMI may offer important clinical information and contribute to the early risk stratification of patients.
  • Low HR variability counts can be observed in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, in congestive heart failure,l0l'1 and after heart transplantation
  • Several data in this study indicate that the degree of HR variability reduction we found is related to clinical severity and infarct size: 1) HR variability was greater in non-Q-wave than in Q-wave AMI; 2) there was an inverse relation between HR variability and peak creatine kinase low counts were associated with Killip class >l, use of digitalis and diuretics, faster HR, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction values
  • Low Heart rate variability counts can be observed in diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy, in congestive heart failure,l0l'1 and after heart transplantation. HR variability is decreased before ventricular fibrillation' and has been shown to represent a powerful independent predictor of mortality when recorded after acute myocardial infarction.'

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.