Chlamydia trachomatisPathogenicity and Disease

Disease pathogenesis due to Chlamydia trachomatis is a complicated process that involves: exposure to the organism and infectivity; survival within the host cell; virulence associated with specific strain types; innate and acquired immunity, and host genetic susceptibility to infection and disease

Deborah Dean

2013

Scholarcy highlights

  • Disease pathogenesis due to Chlamydia trachomatis is a complicated process that involves: exposure to the organism and infectivity; survival within the host cell; virulence associated with specific strain types; innate and acquired immunity, and host genetic susceptibility to infection and disease
  • While antibiotics have been successful in treating most uncomplicated C. trachomatis urogenital infections, treatment does not generally resolve persistent infections or prevent autoimmunity as in Reiter's Syndrome, a chronic debilitating reactive arthritis caused by C. trachomatis and other bacterial pathogens
  • The inability to adequately prevent, diagnose, treat and eradicate infection provides the opportunity for pathogenicity and disease

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