Invasive Breast Cancer: Recognition of Molecular Subtypes

Invasive breast carcinoma is the most common cancer of women and has been categorized by histomorphological criteria into invasive ductal carcinoma, invasive lobular carcinoma, and other less common subtypes

Johanna D. Strehl

2017

Scholarcy highlights

  • Invasive breast carcinoma is the most common cancer of women and has been categorized by histomorphological criteria into invasive ductal carcinoma, invasive lobular carcinoma, and other less common subtypes
  • It is intriguing that not all breast cancers defined as HER2 positive by immunohistochemistry are classified as HER2 enriched by molecular profiling
  • The criticism inherent in the stringent validation of molecular profiling should not be misinterpreted as a rejection of an exciting new technology
  • The massive potential of this powerful high-throughput technology which allows investigators to better capture the molecular diversity of cancer cannot be overestimated, especially as the high-throughput technologies are continually being improved and expanded
  • Molecular profiling should be regarded as a component of the whole clinico-pathological picture and not be aggressively marketed as a superior substitute to the diagnostic, prognostic and predictive methods currently in use
  • Retaliation has occurred in the form of growing criticism, cumulating in one expert in biomarkers claiming that it is statistically and mathematically possible to prove that any given gene affects survival ‘even if it does not’
  • In the interest of science and patient care alike it is time to take the competitive edge out of the discussion regarding molecular profiling

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