Update on Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

Focal epilepsy occurs in 60% of patients with epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common of these

Seyed M. Mirsattari; Warren T. Blume

2013

Scholarcy highlights

  • Focal epilepsy occurs in 60% of patients with epilepsy and temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common of these
  • Focal epilepsy occurs in 60% of patients with epilepsy and TLE is the most common of these
  • Pastor et al.; high desynchronisation levels were found in MRI-normal mesial temporal epilepsy patients. at simultaneous EEG-functional MRI recording may facilitate disclosure of the neurobiology of ictal and interictal epileptiform discharges, which is described by S
  • Since the era of Wilder Pen eld, a detailed pre- and postoperative memory evaluation has been considered requisite for temporal lobectomy consideration, especially when the le side is involved in epileptogenesis. e noninvasive fMRI, here described by C
  • Wang et al describe the ability of functional MRI to map language networks in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy and compares its capability in this assessment with more traditional tests such as Wada and cortical stimulation. e particular “challenges and solutions” of language mapping in children undergoing temporal lobectomy are described by S. de Ribaupierre et al Temporal lobe neuroanatomy is a complex subject that perhaps is best comprehended by two approaches as presented in this volume
  • Ang have reviewed the several pathological abnormalities found in human temporal lobe resection specimens, including some newly recognised tumours; presumably, each contributes to epileptogenesis. e pathogenesis of mesial temporal sclerosis, the most common lesion found with temporal lobe seizures is more complex than rst realised
  • Associated with a history of febrile seizures, the relationship may involve another temporal lobe lesion “dual pathology.” e illustrative case of cryptogenic status epilepticus leading to mesial temporal sclerosis presented by J

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