So Many Plasminogen Receptors: Why?

Plasminogen receptors are a broadly distributed and heterogeneous group of cell surface proteins that share a common feature, the ability to interact with plasminogen and plasmin

Edward F. Plow; Loic Doeuvre; Riku Das

2012

Scholarcy highlights

  • Plasminogen receptors are a broadly distributed and heterogeneous group of cell surface proteins that share a common feature, the ability to interact with plasminogen and plasmin
  • Many of these PlgRs are expressed by many different cell types, and many are present on the same cell type
  • Besides annexin2, other plasma membrane proteins, NaV1.8 sodium channel, TASK1 potassium channel, TRPV5/TRPV6 channels, and cathepsin B have been shown to interact with p11, could assist in its transport to the cell surface, and may still further extend the repertoire of Plg-Rs expressed by monocytoid cells
  • With so many different receptors frequently, with many of them expressed on the same cell type, it is difficult to envision how the cell would prioritize its utilization among these multiple Plg-R
  • Affinity differences between Plg-Rs for their Plg and plasmin ligands could distinguish one receptor from another, but this can only be tested by direct comparisons among Plg-Rs
  • In each of the explanations suggested above, to account for the profound role of many different Plg-Rs in what is globally visualized as a single cellular response, macrophage recruitment into the peritoneum, comparative studies are again needed
  • The goal of such comparative studies is not to prove that one particular Plasminogen receptors is better than another, but rather to help dissect the ways in which Plg orchestrates cell migration and other cellular responses in vivo

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