The stress response in fish

The stress response in teleost fish shows many similarities to that of the terrestrial vertebrates

S. E. Wendelaar Bonga

2017

Scholarcy highlights

  • The stress response in teleost fish shows many similarities to that of the terrestrial vertebrates
  • Conspicuous differences, are present, and these are primarily related to the aquatic environment of fishes
  • Stressors increase the permeability of the surface epithelia, including the gills, to water and ions, and induce systemic hydromineral disturbances
  • High circulating catecholamine levels as well as structural damage to the gills and perhaps the skin are prime causal factors. This is associated with increased cellular turnover in these organs
  • Cortisol combines glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid actions, with the latter being essential for the restoration of hydromineral homeostasis, in concert with hormones such as prolactin and growth hormone
  • Because hydromineral disturbance is inherent to stress in fish, external factors such as water pH, mineral composition, and ionic calcium levels have a significant impact on stressor intensity
  • The species studied comprise a small and nonrepresentative sample of the almost 20,000 known teleost species, there are many indications that the stress response is variable and flexible in fish, in line with the great diversity of adaptations that enable these animals to live in a large variety of aquatic habitats

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