Quantum Theory of the Optical and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors

A strict separation is impossible. Electronic devices such as a p-n diode can only be underv vi Quantum Theory of the Optical and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors stood if one considers interband transitions, and many optical devices cannot be understood if one does not take into account the effects of intraband scattering, carrier transport and diffusion

Hartmut Haug; Stephan W Koch

2012

Scholarcy highlights

  • A strict separation is impossible. Electronic devices such as a p-n diode can only be underv vi Quantum Theory of the Optical and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors stood if one considers interband transitions, and many optical devices cannot be understood if one does not take into account the effects of intraband scattering, carrier transport and diffusion
  • It is possible to talk about low-dimensional systems such as quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots which are effectively two, one and zero dimensional. These few examples suffice to illustrate the need for a modern textbook on the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors and semiconductor devices
  • There is a growing demand for solid-state physicists, electrical and optical engineers who understand enough of the basic microscopic theory of semiconductors to be able to use effectively the possibilities to engineer, design and optimize optical and electronic devices with certain desired characteristics
  • Semiconductor quantum dots are treated in a separate chapter
  • 5.4 Quasi-Equilibrium Regime: Quantum Theory of the Optical and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors Downloaded from www.worldscientific.com by 134.209.191.232 on 11/28/21

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