The Sorghum bicolor Root Exudate Sorgoleone Shapes Bacterial Communities and Delays Network Formation

Since sorghum is an important worldwide cereal crop and is rapidly becoming an important bioenergy crop, this study focused on determining whether sorgoleone alters the bacterial and archaeal communities of the root microbiome and whether it influences the nitrogen cycling under field conditions

Peng Wang; Yen Ning Chai; Rebecca Roston; Franck E. Dayan; Daniel P. Schachtman

2021

Scholarcy highlights

  • Primary and secondary metabolites exuded from roots are key drivers of root-soil microbe interactions that contribute to the structure and function of microbial communities
  • The transcripts of Sobic.005G164300.1 and Sobic.008G036800 corresponding to ARS1 and ARS2 genes involved in sorgoleone biosynthesis were detected, with highest expression early in plant development at approximately 8 days after emergence of seedlings and gradually decreasing from 24 days to 96 days
  • Since sorghum is an important worldwide cereal crop and is rapidly becoming an important bioenergy crop, this study focused on determining whether sorgoleone alters the bacterial and archaeal communities of the root microbiome and whether it influences the nitrogen cycling under field conditions
  • Previous work has shown that specific nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by sorgoleone, our findings revealed that the abundance and growth of a much wider range of bacterial taxa are both inhibited and promoted by sorgoleone in the rhizosphere
  • The greenhouse results confirmed trends measured in the field, where higher concentrations of sorgoleone exuded from wild-type sorghum roots led to alterations in the composition of the rhizosphere bacterial microbiome
  • There were no significant differences in endosphere microbial communities
  • Two observations in this study suggest that biological nitrification inhibition through sorgoleone may be of limited importance for reducing the nitrate leaching from the soil
  • These findings provide additional insight into how altering these root exudation processes in plants may provide effective approaches for engineering soil microbiomes that enhance the stress tolerance and increase the productivity of agroecosystems

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