Novel Mode of Microbial Energy Metabolism: Organic Carbon Oxidation Coupled to Dissimilatory Reduction of Iron or Manganese

We describe an isolate from these sediments which grows under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing organic compounds to carbon dioxide with Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor

Derek R. Lovley

2020

Scholarcy highlights

  • A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland
  • This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth
  • We describe an isolate from these sediments which grows under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing organic compounds to carbon dioxide with Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor
  • The results demonstrate that microorganisms can obtain energy for growth by coupling the oxidation of organic matter to the dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV)
  • These results further indicate that there are microorganisms in sediments which are capable of completely oxidizing organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor
  • GS-15 was subcultured through more than 10 transfers through FWA
  • Geochemical evidence had previously suggested that organic matter could be completely oxidized to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor, the isolation of GS-15 has provided the first example of a microbiological mechanism for these reactions

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