Inactivation of Feline Calicivirus and Adenovirus Type 40 by UV Radiation

The results of this study indicate that if feline calicivirus is an adequate surrogate for human caliciviruses, their inactivation by UV radiation is similar to those of other single-stranded RNA enteric viruses, such as poliovirus

Jeanette A. Thurston-Enriquez; Charles N. Haas; Joseph Jacangelo; Kelley Riley; Charles P. Gerba

2003

Scholarcy highlights

  • Disinfection is an important treatment barrier between drinking water consumers and viral gastroenteritis, since the small size of enteric viruses may permit their passage through conventional filtration processes
  • The inactivation kinetics of enteric adenovirus type 40, coliphage MS-2, and feline calicivirus, closely related to the human caliciviruses based on nucleic acid organization and capsid architecture, were determined after exposure to low-pressure UV radiation in buffered demand-free water at room temperature
  • The results of this study indicate that if FCV is an adequate surrogate for human caliciviruses, their inactivation by UV radiation is similar to those of other single-stranded RNA enteric viruses, such as poliovirus
  • The results of this study indicate that UV inactivation of FCV is similar to that of other single-stranded RNA viruses, such as poliovirus type 1
  • Doses required to achieve 90 to 99.99% inactivation of AD40 were higher than those previously reported for other enteric viruses and adenoviruses
  • The doses observed in this study for coliphage MS-2 were over 3 times higher than those for FCV and over 2 times lower than those observed for AD40 inactivation in BDF water
  • Susceptibility of the virus to UV light is highest for feline calicivirus, followed by MS-2 and adenovirus type 40 in absorbance-free water and in treated groundwater containing constituents that absorb UV light

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