Transition metal–catalyzed alkyl-alkyl bond formation: Another dimension in cross-coupling chemistry

We describe recent progress in addressing these objectives, with a particular focus on initial breakthroughs in alkyl–alkyl cross-couplings of unactivated alkyl electrophiles

Junwon Choi; Gregory C. Fu

2017

Scholarcy highlights

  • The construction of carbon–carbon bonds is central to organic chemistry, which is the chemistry of molecules that contain carbon
  • We describe recent progress in addressing these objectives, with a particular focus on initial breakthroughs in alkyl–alkyl cross-couplings of unactivated alkyl electrophiles
  • The ability to employ secondary electrophiles as partners opened the door to an additional dimension in cross-coupling chemistry, catalytic enantioselective carbon–carbon bond formation starting with racemic alkyl electrophiles
  • Because catalytic asymmetric alkyl–alkyl cross-couplings are still in a relatively early stage of development, we describe couplings of unactivated alkyl electrophiles, and of several activated alkyl electrophiles
  • Because alkyl–alkyl bonds are commonplace in organic molecules, the development of increasingly powerful methods for their construction from readily available coupling partners will have a significant impact on the many disciplines that employ organic compounds
  • Medicinal chemists have observed that many current efforts in drug development may be biased toward compounds that have aromatic subunits, as a consequence of the dependability of cross-coupling reactions of readily available aryl electrophiles and nucleophiles
  • The development of increasingly versatile tools for alkyl–alkyl bond formation, including stereoselective processes, may facilitate an “escape from flatland”

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