A Test of Climate, Sun, and Culture Relationships from an 1810-Year Chinese Cave Record

We identified an unusual stalagmite sample from Wanxiang Cave, China, that is ideally suited to mitigate these problems

Pingzhong Zhang; Hai Cheng; R. Lawrence Edwards; Fahu Chen; Yongjin Wang; Xunlin Yang; Jian Liu; Ming Tan; Xianfeng Wang; Jinghua Liu; Chunlei An; Zhibo Dai; Jing Zhou; Dezhong Zhang; Jihong Jia; Liya Jin; Kathleen R. Johnson

2008

Scholarcy highlights

  • The summer monsoon correlates with solar variability, Northern Hemisphere and Chinese temperature, Alpine glacial retreat, and Chinese cultural changes
  • It was generally strong during Europe's Medieval Warm Period and weak during Europe's Little Ice Age, as well as during the final decades of the Tang, Yuan, and Ming Dynasties, all times that were characterized by popular unrest
  • We still do not know, in detail, how late Holocene Asian Monsoon changes relate to solar activity, climate in other regions, anthropogenic forcing, and cultural changes, mainly because of age uncertainties and the insufficient resolution ofexisting records
  • We identified an unusual stalagmite sample from Wanxiang Cave, China, that is ideally suited to mitigate these problems
  • Based on an ECHO-G climate model simulation, we modeled Chinese air temperature for the past millenniwn, with results that were broadly consistent with our record, with regard to centennial and multicentennial time scales and with regard to the distinct double peak in both model output and record during the Medieval Warm Period
  • Our record shows general Asian Monsoon weakening over the past half century, with much of the change taldng place in the past two decades, which is consistent with other AM indices and anticorrelating with rising Northern Hemisphere temperature

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