Influences of sensory input from the limbs on feline corticospinal neurons during postural responses

By comparing pyramidal tract neurons responses to tilts in different tests we found that the amplitude and the phase of the response in the majority of them were determined primarily by the sensory input from the corresponding contralateral limb

A. Karayannidou

2007

Scholarcy highlights

  • When standing, quadrupeds maintain a specific, dorsal-side-up body posture due to the activity of the postural control system
  • Quadrupeds maintain a specific, dorsal-side-up body posture due to the activity of the postural control system. This system is driven by sensory feedback signals and generates corrective motor responses when the body orientation deviates from the desired one
  • We examined the tilt-related activity of the main cortical output ā€“ pyramidal tract neurons from the limb representation of the motor cortex
  • We have found that sensory input from the receptive field could be responsible for the tilt-related modulation in only a proportion of PTNs, whereas in other PTNs the modulation was caused by another sensory input
  • The cat maintains a specific, dorsal-side-up body orientation in the frontal plane due to the activity of the postural control system. This system is driven by sensory feedback signals and generates corrective motor responses when the body orientation in the frontal plane deviates from the desired one
  • Each limb controller contains a reflex mechanism driven by somatosensory input from its own limb
  • A striking similarity was found between the mean frequencies of pyramidal tract neurons in different postural tests ā€“ they ranged from 11.9 to 16.9 imp sāˆ’1 in forelimb PTNs and from 16.6 to 20.0 imp sāˆ’1 in hindlimb PTNs. This was in contrast with the tilt-related modulation of PTNs, whose value strongly differed in different tests

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