Psychometric and Adaptive Abilities in Epilepsy with Differential Etiology

These results suggested that epileptic manifestations, regardless of etiology, resulted in significant impairment of adaptive and psychometric abilities, but that in those epileptic patients in whom verified lesions could be established, the ictal episodes per se did not result in significant additional cognitive impairment when compared to non-epileptic patients matched for type of pathology

H. KLØVE; C. G. MATTHEWS

2007

Scholarcy highlights

  • Comparisons on an extensive battery of neuropsychological tests including the WAIS and Halstead's measures were made in the following four groups:: 1, controls; 2, patients with verified brain damage but without epilepsy; 3, brain-damaged patients with epilepsy matched for type of brain damage with the patients in Group 2; 4, patients with epilepsy of unknown etiology matched with the patients in Group 3 for type of seizures
  • The results of the study indicated that the presence of epileptic seizures was associated with significantly lower psychometric and adaptive ability levels than those found in normal control subjects
  • These test score differences occurred both in epileptic patients whose epilepsy was of unknown etiology and in epileptic patients with verified cerebral pathology
  • Comparisons of two groups matched for type of pathology, but with and without seizures, did not result in additional significant impairment in the seizure group
  • These results suggested that epileptic manifestations, regardless of etiology, resulted in significant impairment of adaptive and psychometric abilities, but that in those epileptic patients in whom verified lesions could be established, the ictal episodes per se did not result in significant additional cognitive impairment when compared to non-epileptic patients matched for type of pathology

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