Neuroimmune mechanisms in patients with atopic dermatitis during chronic stress

We investigated patients with atopic dermatitis, with histories of chronic stress, taking biopsies for immunohistochemistry, studying nerve density, expression of sensory neuropeptides and serotonin and its receptors, as well as serotonin transporter protein

SB Lonne-Rahm

Scholarcy highlights

  • Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic skin disease, which affects about 2% to 3% of the adult population.1 It produces an extremely itchy skin
  • Whereas there was no significant change in the number of substance P and calcitonin generelated peptide–positive nerve fibres between the involved and non-involved skin, there was an increase in the epidermal fraction of 5-hydroxtrytamine 1A
  • There was an increase in mast cells in the involved skin, and these cells were often located close to the basement membrane
  • There was a strong tendency to a correlation between 5-HT2AR positive cells in the papillary dermis of involved skin and low cortisol ratios, being an indicator of chronic stress
  • We investigated patients with atopic dermatitis, with histories of chronic stress, taking biopsies for immunohistochemistry, studying nerve density, expression of sensory neuropeptides and serotonin and its receptors, as well as serotonin transporter protein
  • There were a few fibres positive for calcitonin generelated peptide in the epidermis but no significant difference in fibre density between involved and noninvolved skin, as was the case for the papillary dermis
  • We report a decreased innervation in the involved compared to non-involved skin in AD patients
  • A changed innervation and modulation of the serotonergic system are indicated in chronic atopic eczema during chronic stress

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