Quantitative genetic analysis of the physiological stress response in three strains of brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis and their hybrids

While our results revealed no clear evidence of heterosis, relatively high heritability was found for endocrine and physiological responses

A. Crespel; L. Bernatchez; D. Garant; C. Audet

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • During aquaculture and stocking activities, fish are faced with several potential stressors
  • Biochemical and physiological secondary responses associated with the release of stress hormones activate metabolic pathways that result in the modification of blood chemistry and haematology, including a rapid release of glucose to provide sufficient energy, changes in osmolarity, and lysozyme activity
  • Dam and sire origin significantly affected the stress response depending on the trait as was the case for heritability, the parental origin effect was strong for cortisol
  • The results for the secondary response show different tendencies: there were significant effects of both dam and sire origin in the cortisol response, with fish issued from the Rupert strain having lower plasma cortisol than other fish; no significant dam or sire effect was observed for the glucose response; and there was a significant dam origin effect on the osmolality and haematocrit stress responses
  • Our main objectives were to determine whether heterosis occurred and to estimate the heritability of primary and secondary stress indicators in brook charr
  • While our results revealed no clear evidence of heterosis, relatively high heritability was found for endocrine and physiological responses
  • The significant heritability of stress response at both the primary and secondary levels indicates a good potential for selective breeding and genetic improved resistance to transport stress in brook charr, and so for the Rupert strain

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