Effects of plant genotype and growth stage on the structure of bacterial communities associated with potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

We demonstrated that these factors exerted effects on the bacterial communities that are present in the rhizosphere as well as inside plants, which opens a new perspective on the factors driving endophyte diversity

Leo Van Overbeek; Jan Dirk Van Elsas

2008

Scholarcy highlights

  • The preservation of beneficial plant-associated microbial communities to support plant health is an important issue in agriculture, especially in the light of the need to enhance sustainability
  • Plant genotype can exert strong effects on the bacterial communities that associate with plants
  • Multivariate analyses of the PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints from bulk soils confirmed the observations made with phylotype diversity, namely that no significant effects of plant growth stage were found with the three applied primer systems
  • Genotype, plant growth stage and experiment were found to be the three factors affecting the composition of the bacterial communities associated
  • They assessed target and nontarget microarthropods associated with a transgenic maize line equipped with the cry1Ab gene. Generalizing this issue, it becomes clear that, in many cases, plant growth and soil factors exert stronger effects on the microbial communities associated with plants than does plant genotype. We demonstrated that these factors exerted effects on the bacterial communities that are present in the rhizosphere as well as inside plants, which opens a new perspective on the factors driving endophyte diversity
  • There were no significant differences between both plant lines in the fingerprints made with the three primer systems at three growth stages
  • Plant growth stage and experiment, which were the factors that contributed most to the variations in the potato-associated bacterial communities in most, but not all cases, overwhelmed the variation caused by differences in plant genotype

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