Social networking site use: Linked to adolescents' social self‐concept, self‐esteem, and depressed mood

The results showed that frequency of social networking sites use was linked to higher social self‐concept while investment in SNSs was associated with lower self‐esteem and higher depressed mood

Corey J. Blomfield neira; Bonnie L. Barber

2013

Scholarcy highlights

  • Adolescents spend a substantial amount of time using social networking sites; little is known regarding whether such use is associated with indicators of adjustment
  • As social comparison and peer feedback are integral to adolescents' self‐evaluations, it is theoretically plausible that the increased frequency with which these are likely to occur as a result of involvement in SNSs could underlie possible associations between SNS use and social self‐concept, self‐esteem, and depressed mood
  • The current study found that male youth with an SNS profile had a significantly higher social self‐concept, and this is not statistically significant, males reported higher self‐esteem than did males without an SNS profile
  • This result supported our hypothesis that SNS use would be associated with a more positive social self‐concept, albeit the link was only for male youth
  • Consistent with Barker's finding that male youth seek social connection through SNS use, our results suggest that male youth may see SNSs as a place in which to practice and refine their social skills and competencies, and feel more socially competent
  • There was no significant difference in social self‐concept between females with and without an SNS profile
  • Previous research has indicated that female youth use the Internet to seek feedback about themselves from others, and as the tone of feedback has been linked to self‐evaluations, it is possible that female youth perceive some of the feedback they receive to be negative, which has subsequently influenced their indicators of adjustment
  • This result supported our hypothesis that social networking sites use would be associated with a more positive social self‐concept, albeit the link was only for male youth

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