Self-Objectification and Its Psychological Outcomes for College Women

The objectification of women by our society can become internalized by women, resulting in negative psychological outcomes

Jennifer J. Muehlenkamp; Renee N. Saris-Baglama

2003

Scholarcy highlights

  • The objectification of women by our society can become internalized by women, resulting in negative psychological outcomes
  • Using Fredrickson and Roberts' objectification theory, we tested a model of the relationships between self-objectification and disordered eating and depressive symptoms in a sample of undergraduate women
  • One postulate of self-objectification theory is that self-objectification can lead to a lack of internal awareness, which may mediate the relationship between self-objectification and restrictive eating, bulimic, and depressive symptoms
  • Results of structural equation modeling suggest that self-objectification has a direct relationship to restrictive eating, bulimic, and depressive symptoms
  • The mediational role of internal awareness was relevant for depressive symptoms but not for restrictive eating or bulimic symptoms
  • The relevance of our findings to the understanding of objectification theory are discussed and future areas of research recommended

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