Antecedents and consequences of employee engagement revisited

The results indicate that skill variety is the main job characteristic that predicts job engagement

Alan M. Saks

2019

Scholarcy highlights

  • In 2006, Saks published one of the first empirical studies of the antecedents and consequences of employee engagement
  • The results indicate that skill variety is the main job characteristic that predicts job engagement
  • The results of the analysis using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale measure of work engagement found that job characteristics and perceived organizational support are significant predictors of work engagement, and work engagement predicts job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior and intentions to quit and mediates the relationship between the antecedents and the consequences
  • A revised and updated model is provided with additional antecedents and consequences
  • The results indicate that organizations can drive employee engagement by focusing on skill variety as well as providing social support, rewards and recognition, procedural and distributive fairness, and opportunities for learning and development
  • This paper provides an update and revision of the Saks model of employee engagement and suggests that the main findings are similar when using the UWES measure of work engagement and single-item general measures of job engagement and organization engagement
  • This paper provides an update and revision of the Saks model of employee engagement and suggests that the main findings are similar when using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale measure of work engagement and single-item general measures of job engagement and organization engagement

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