Cancer‐induced muscle atrophy is determined by intrinsic muscle oxidative capacity

We tested the hypothesis that cancer cachexia progression would induce oxidative post-translational modifications associated with skeletal muscle wasting, with different responses in muscles with the prevalence of glycolytic and oxidative fibers

Christiano R. R. Alves; Eric J. Eichelberger; Willian Neves; Márcio A. C. Ribeiro; Luiz R. G. Bechara; Vanessa A. Voltarelli; Ney R. Almeida; Lars Hagen; Animesh Sharma; Julio C. B. Ferreira; Kathryn J. Swoboda; Geir Slupphaug; Patricia C. Brum

2021

Scholarcy highlights

  • We tested the hypothesis that cancer cachexia progression would induce oxidative post-translational modifications associated with skeletal muscle wasting, with different responses in muscles with the prevalence of glycolytic and oxidative fibers
  • Histological analysis revealed muscle atrophy in type II fibers in plantaris muscle, with no changes in plantaris type I fibers and no differences in both soleus type I and II fibers in tumor-bearing rats when compared to healthy controls
  • Pathway analysis including the differentially oxidized proteins revealed tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation as main affected pathways in plantaris muscle from tumor-bearing rats, while the same analysis did not show main metabolic pathways affected in the soleus muscle
  • Cancer progression affected several metabolic parameters such as ATP levels and markers of oxidative stress associated with muscle atrophy in plantaris muscle, but not in soleus
  • Isolated soleus from tumor-bearing rats had a reduced force production capacity when compared to controls. These novel findings demonstrate that tumor-bearing rats have severe muscle atrophy exclusively in glycolytic fibers
  • Cancer progression is associated with cysteine Ox-PTMs in the skeletal muscle, but these modifications affect different pathways in a glycolytic muscle compared to an oxidative muscle, indicating that intrinsic muscle oxidative capacity determines the response to cancer cachectic effects
  • Any queries should be directed to the corresponding author for the article

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