'Congenital solitary functioning kidneys: which ones warrant follow-up into adult life?'

Based on the data available to date, we propose an aggressive approach to patients with solitary kidney of congenital origin

V. Corbani

2011

Scholarcy highlights

  • Overall, >30% of patients with solitary functioning kidney showed evidence of renal injury. These data indicate that a significant fraction of children with congenital solitary kidney show evidence of renal parenchyma damage early in life and can potentially progress to end-stage renal failure in adulthood
  • The proportion of patients with a congenital solitary kidney who present with signs of renal damage and who progress to ESRF by the age of 30 in the general population is not 50% but, for example, 10–20%, it is in any case extremely important to identify this category early in life in order to establish a close follow-up, treat the associated conditions that accelerate progression, like coexistent anomalies in the unique kidney, high blood pressure and proteinuria and plan a careful transition from paediatric to adult nephrology services
  • A good outcome in patients with a congenital solitary kidney has been erroneously suggested by translating results derived from surgical SFK from donor transplant programs or long-term survivors from Wilms’ tumour diagnosed in childhood
  • Based on the data available to date, we propose an aggressive approach to patients with solitary kidney of congenital origin
  • Children with solitary functioning kidney and no ipsilateral CAKUT, who tended to be considered as having a benign condition, are more likely to be overlooked and present later in life already in chronic renal failure

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