Effect of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treatment on cardiovascular outcome

Trials suggest that long-acting muscarinic antagonists and long-acting beta agonists are safe when used in appropriate doses in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who do not have uncontrolled cardiovascular disease, but in patients with underlying CVD or who use higher doses or more pharmacologically active medications the implications are less clear

Jennifer Quint

2018

Scholarcy highlights

  • The mainstay of pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treatment is inhalers, consisting of bronchodilators, both long-acting muscarinic antagonists and long-acting beta agonists, and inhaled corticosteroids
  • Trials suggest that long-acting muscarinic antagonists and long-acting beta agonists are safe when used in appropriate doses in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who do not have uncontrolled cardiovascular disease, but in patients with underlying CVD or who use higher doses or more pharmacologically active medications the implications are less clear
  • Some people would argue that the data that currently exist from trials are not representative of real life and the long-term safety of COPD treatments is not known in the people in whom it matters most

Need more features? Save interactive summary cards to your Scholarcy Library.