Endocrine Control of Osmoregulation in Teleost Fish

Evidence presented in this review indicates that the GH/IGF-I axis has a role in seawater acclimation, and that GH, IGF-I and cortisol interact positively to promote salt secretion and the underlying

Stephen D. McCormick

2006

Scholarcy highlights

  • In this paper I will review recent evidence for the hormones involved in development and differentiation of transport epithelia that control the ability of teleost fish to move between fresh water and seawater
  • Cortisol has long been known to play an important role in seawater acclimation of teleost fishes
  • Evidence presented in this review indicates that the GH/IGF-I axis has a role in seawater acclimation, and that GH, IGF-I and cortisol interact positively to promote salt secretion and the underlying physiological processes
  • Prolactin has a well-established role in ion uptake and inhibition of salt secretion
  • This review has presented evidence that there are many common features to the endocrine control of osmoregulation in teleost fish
  • Most of the regulatory actions described above have examined seawater-adapted fish, and there is relatively little information on rapid stimulation of transport epithelia involved in net ion uptake in fresh water

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