Regulation of tillering in sorghum: environmental effects

Tillering is an important agronomic trait in many high-tillering cereals such as wheat, rice and barley, and contributed significantly to improved yield associated with the ‘green revolution’

Hae Koo Kim; Erik van Oosterom; Michael Dingkuhn; Delphine Luquet; Graeme Hammer

2010

Scholarcy highlights

  • Tillering is an important agronomic trait in many high-tillering cereals such as wheat, rice and barley, and contributed significantly to improved yield associated with the ‘green revolution’
  • photo-thermal quotient was lowest in the controlled environment experiments due to low radiation levels, high temperature contributed in expt 4
  • Environmental control of tillering in sorghum through regulation of internal plant competition for carbohydrates was quantified by growing a representative hybrid in five experiments with varying radiation and temperature
  • Results showed that tiller appearance was highly synchronized with main shoot leaf appearance, with a consistent hierarchy for tillering across environments
  • Environments mainly differed in the frequency of appearance of lower-rank tillers. This explained some of the observed environmental differences in the onset of tiller appearance and was consistent with the hypothesis that internal plant competition determines tillering
  • A generalized S/Dindex that accounted for environmental effects on plant development and assimilate supply and demand explained most of the variation in maximum tiller number observed across experiments
  • Differences in leaf size were small and the low Ntiller,max per plant in expt 3 was predominantly due to

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